I gave Bing a chance because of the rewards. That was a year ago. I learned 2 important lessons over those 12 months: Bing's rewards are terrible, but Bing search results are worse. I am glad to be back to Google search. But I agree with the premise of this article: with so much data running through Google tools, individual privacy is at risk. Time to find a new browser and/or a new search engine.
Does Google have too much power? As of January 2017, Google was powering over 63 percent of U.S. searches, giving it unrivaled access to our browsing habits, and more. Furthermore, Google tracks your every search to build an individual advertising profile. The search giant knows more about your browsing habits How Much Does Google Really Know About You? How Much Does Google Really Know About You? Google is no champion of user privacy, but you might be surprised just how much they know. Read More than you could hope to imagine.
By checking this box and submitting this form, I certify that I have provided true and accurate information and that I have read and understood the dealership's privacy policy. I authorize the dealer to begin a credit investigation, to process my application, and to forward my application to lenders, financial institutions, or other third parties.
For real I can't see alternative for Google. If you are smart enough you can use Google without giving them too much data about yourself. Just use incognito mode in chrome, change applications permissions at your phone, etc. Use it smart. Of course you can't hide all informations about yourself but you don't need to login as Adam Smith, use nickname, turn off GPS if it's not necessary.

By checking this box and submitting this form, I certify that I have provided true and accurate information and that I have read and understood the dealership's privacy policy. I authorize the dealer to begin a credit investigation, to process my application, and to forward my application to lenders, financial institutions, or other third parties.

This article was considered relevant to me by Goole, on my android phone, does me reading it constitute a paradox? I am a fan of my google devices, and although I completely understand the issues people have with the invasiveness of it all, I believe the train has already left the station on this issue, you'd have an easier time getting rid of sliced bread.
Everybody who uses the Facebook-app agrees that his/her entire phone book is uploaded to Facebook. This means that even if you're not using Google, not using WhatsApp and don't have a Facebook-account, your name, phone number, birthday and likely your address is already in Facebook's databases as soon as one of your colleagues uses that app - and this WITHOUT even asking you if you agree with Facebook having your data - thank your friends for uploading your data without asking you first. If there are more than two or three of your friends who use the Facebook-app, Facebook is already able to profile you pretty good according to your friends, their friends and all their preferences - without asking you for any agreement for this profiling. Comparing to that, I prefer Google's style of data-collecting since they show you very transparent that and what data they are collecting - and you still can opt out (or even have to opt in in first place) from everything. The true "privacy-enemy" are Facebook and similar, not Google...
Is it time to leave Google search behind Which Search Engine Should You Be Using Today? Which Search Engine Should You Be Using Today? There are many search engines out there, but which one is the best for you? Read More ? I think the real question to ask yourself is, “Can you live without Google services?” Including YouTube, Docs, Sheets, Maps, your Android powered smartphone Here's How You Can Use Android But Ditch Google Here's How You Can Use Android But Ditch Google Want to use your Android smartphone or tablet without Google? Want to use open source software? Here we take an in-depth look at exactly how to do that. Read More , and so on. It’s a lot to let go.

Everybody who uses the Facebook-app agrees that his/her entire phone book is uploaded to Facebook. This means that even if you're not using Google, not using WhatsApp and don't have a Facebook-account, your name, phone number, birthday and likely your address is already in Facebook's databases as soon as one of your colleagues uses that app - and this WITHOUT even asking you if you agree with Facebook having your data - thank your friends for uploading your data without asking you first. If there are more than two or three of your friends who use the Facebook-app, Facebook is already able to profile you pretty good according to your friends, their friends and all their preferences - without asking you for any agreement for this profiling. Comparing to that, I prefer Google's style of data-collecting since they show you very transparent that and what data they are collecting - and you still can opt out (or even have to opt in in first place) from everything. The true "privacy-enemy" are Facebook and similar, not Google...

Trust and privacy are the biggest reasons to leave Google and its search algorithm behind. There is no beating about the bush. The sheer number of searches conducted every single day by Google is astonishing. They hold tens of exabytes of data on every subject matter you’d care to think of. And your personal data, your personal searches, your obscure, seemingly trivial or highly embarrassing searches, are in there too.
The College Scorecard was born of an Education Department effort to hold underperforming institutions accountable. But it would be a stretch, Katzman said, to credit Google for promoting accountability by surfacing the Scorecard data. For-profit colleges with underwhelming graduation rates and student-debt levels have been “some of Google’s largest advertisers” over the years, he said. “If Google really wanted to help solve the problem, they might limit advertising to the schools that had a better performance on the report card.”
Lots of terms are thrown around by different car dealerships try to be like AutoMax. In short, “we finance”, “on-the-lot financing”, and “buy here pay here” advertisements all mean the same thing. Auto dealers of all shapes and sizes use these sayings interchangeably to describe the in-house auto financing available to car buying customers at their dealerships. The problem is very few actually offer this type of financing. AutoMax is 100% Buy Here Pay Here 100% of the time. All our cars are Buy Here Pay Here cars. All our customers are Buy Here Pay Here customers. If you come to AutoMax and you are not a good fit for our program will gladly refer to another dealership.
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